Tips for user adoption

We all know that one of the big bugbears of any changes you make as an Admin or Developer is getting users to like it. Here are some of the main tips for making sure you really get across to your users why changes will help them.

Training

Your Admins and Devs have been working hard to produce a platform that’ll make your sales reps and users more efficient to increase sales. Before anybody can get their hands on the system, it’s important that they’re properly trained, so they can understand how to use the changes as well as understand what’s different and exactly why the change was needed.

Within the training of teams, you might want to create some exercises to make it more engaging and less of a “this is what’s happening, tough luck” approach. Make sure these exercises are appropriate for each team you train, as different areas of the business might be using Salesforce in a different way.

When you’re training users, whether this is on a new Salesforce org, or on some changes within a current one, users can get quite tired as there is usually a lot to take in. You need to make sure that breaks are used to allow trainees to get the most of the session.

Train the trainer

You’ll also need to choose who’s going to be training. You might have multiple Admins/Devs or even some super-users who’ll be going away to teach these users. One approach to training is a ‘train the trainer’ approach. This means the admins and people who are very familiar with the system will train some key users of the system.

These users will then go away and train the rest of the team. This can sometimes be a better approach because usually the users will be more comfortable with these key users, so feedback will come more easily.

If you’re just making changes in the system, it might be worth getting some opinions on where training should be given in other areas of the system, which don’t necessarily relate to the change in hand. This can be used as a refresher to the team to help them understand the capabilities of Salesforce and make their job easier.

Rolling out

The rollout can be done in a few different approaches, and one that is recommended is giving access to some key users within the company. These key users can then get their hands on it to see how it handles normal, day to day operational use. This can then be rolled out to other teams in the business.

For example, say you’ve changed the fields on the opportunity object and want to let some key ‘super-users’ test it out and give any initial feedback before rolling it out to different areas of the team.

In the early stages of the rollout, its best to take things slow — allow time for users to get used to the new system. They will more than likely struggle to navigate, and whoever deals with internal cases/questions will be getting a lot of enquiries.

Be aware there might be a lot of errors as well. When users get their hands on things, they usually find things you didn’t when initially testing. There will probably be some permissions errors where users get too much/little access to areas of Salesforce. At this stage, it is up to the implementations team to keep everybody happy and get them all through this learning curve.

So, you just failed a Salesforce Cert? Me too. Here’s what I learned.

tips after failing your salesfore certifications

We’ve been having a bit of a drive here lately at oe:gen, a Salesforce Certification drive! We’ve all been pushing ourselves in the last few months (with a bit of friendly internal competition) to up our cert game and try to gain credentials in all the different areas we specialise! People have been attaining certs left and right, bells are ringing, and cake is being eaten, but what happens when the unfortunate happens and… you… fail.

Take a guess who this happened to…

via GIPHY

That’s right, I can admit it! I’m Alex, a Salesforce Consultant and just last week I failed a Salesforce Certification. But you know what? It happens, and there’s a few things I learned from the experience that I’d like to share with you.

Be proud of yourself

The first thing most of us do when we fail is begin to question our own ability, which sometimes isn’t even related to the test/exam/inflatable obstacle course we just fell off… we internalise these thoughts and start believing that we’re frauds for daring to try and not succeed (see Imposter syndrome). We forget that the pursuit of knowledge and ability is something we should be hugely proud of and failing is just a small bump in the road. So, go you for trying!

via GIPHY

Certs are hard for a reason

Having attained a few certs previously, I wholly began underestimating and underappreciating how much experience is needed to pass these exams. Failing one has given me a new appreciation for them and realisation:

CERTS. ARE. HARD. AS. NAILS.

via GIPHY

It’s easy to forget this simple fact, but look back at the recommended pre-requisites of one the next time you’re thinking of taking a cert. Most of them have a number of Trailhead Trails you should complete beforehand and at least 6 months to 1 years’ experience hands on using the platform. If these exams were easy, then the accomplishment of attaining them would be far less rewarding.

Get back on that horse and start studying

The immediate gut reaction to failing anything is usually the want to give up and throw in the towel. It might be only a small thought, but I personally get this niggle in my head for a couple of hours… but then I try to get myself reinvigorated with the material.

via GIPHY

Firstly, I try to look back on why I failed, and how the Salesforce Cert gives you a percentage based on each section is really helpful here. Looking at where I was strong and where I completely dropped the ball (I’m looking at you Salesforce Engage section!) gives me great guidance on where I need to go do some extra studying and focus my attention. This leads into my last point…

Get that exam rebooked!

via GIPHY

Yeah! You heard me! Use your scores from each section to figure out how far off you were from passing. There’s even a handy calculator someone made here that will work out your overall percentage score if you want to get specific. Then, set yourself a new target date to get the exam booked again. Think about it, you have the knowledge from before, you’re going to study up on the parts you weren’t so great at and you now know a little more about how the questions are structured; you got this!

via GIPHY

Sales and marketing lessons we can learn from horror movies

I have a few passions in life; one of them is writing helpful articles for sales and marketing folks, and another is horror movies. So, to honour the spookiest day of the year, I’m going to combine (absolutely shoehorn) the two. Let’s see how this turns out…

Read moreSales and marketing lessons we can learn from horror movies

Find us in the crowds at Dreamforce with what3words!

Dreamforce is back in action on Tuesday 19th November, so we’re heading over to San Francisco again! And this time, we’ll be using our customer’s app, what3words to navigate around the biggest event in the Salesforce world.

What’s what3words, you ask? Well, it’s an app that’s really simplified location finding. It assigns each 3m square in the whole world a unique three-word address that will never change.

For example, ///intervals.using.tapes marks the entrance to oe:gen’s Nottingham office.

The creator of what3words used to work in the music industry and noticed that in the music world, technicians and musicians were getting lost trying to find live events every day. So after experiencing a few too many ‘navigation nightmares’, Chris Sheldrick asked his mathematician school friend, Mohan Ganesalingam, for help with an algorithm to make precise GPS coordinates more concise and easier for people to use.

These three-word addresses are as accurate as GPS coordinates but are much easier to say and share.  People use what3words to find their tents at festivals, navigate to venues, direct emergency services to the right location, and more.

It’s pretty much perfect for navigating San Francisco and the huge space that Dreamforce occupies. Paul will be using it to find his way around and meet up with his pals. If you’d like to grab a drink with Paul in San Fran — be that caffeinated, soft, or alcoholic — send him a little message via this Pardot landing page and he’ll arrange something with you!

Salesforce Women in Tech: Jayne-Anne Gadhia, Salesforce’s UK & Ireland CEO

It might be because it’s October so I’ve started my annual binge-watching of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, or it could be because our quarterly Salesforce Women in Tech event is just around the corner. But this week, we’re all about inspiring, awesome women. And that’s why we’re putting a spotlight on Salesforce’s new Chief Executive of UK and Ireland, Jayne-Anne Gadhia.

Jayne-Anne Gadhia, Founder of the start-up, Snoop, has been chosen to lead Salesforce’s UK and Ireland business, which is the largest market for Salesforce outside of the US!

I did a bit of research on Gadhia, and it turns out she was one of the founders of Virgin Direct in 1995 before spending five years at RBS. She became Chief Executive of Virgin Money in 2007, stepping down in 2018 following its takeover by CYBG. And she’s considered one of the financial services industry’s ‘most senior and best-known women’.

In 2015, the Government asked Gadhia to lead a review into the representation of women in senior managerial roles in financial services. In response to her recommendations in the review, HM Treasury launched the Women in Finance Charter. And now, there are over 330 firms of all shapes and sizes across financial services that are signed up to the commitments of the Charter – from global banks to credit unions, the largest insurance companies to the smallest fintech start-ups – with headquarters in the UK, USA, Europe and Asia.

As you can tell, Gadhia is a huge advocate for gender diversity in business. And in November 2016, she was appointed as the UK Government’s Women in Finance Champion, becoming a founder member of its Business Diversity and Inclusion Group in July 2017.

According to her Wikipedia page, she’s also been open about her experiences of depression and believes that better work-life balance can improve work performance. This is something which we’ve always been passionate about here at oe:gen.

Plus, if you follow her on Twitter, you’ll see how active she is about fighting climate change, advocating for equal pay, and other important causes close to our hearts.

It also mentions that in 2018, Gadhia was named Leader of the Year at the Lloyds Bank National Business Awards and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She was even awarded a CBE in the 2014 New Year Honours and made a Dame in the 2019 New Year’s Honours list!

Marc Benioff and Keith Block said in a joint statement: “Jayne-Anne is one of the most respected CEOs in the UK and we are thrilled to welcome her to Salesforce. With Jayne-Anne’s leadership, we are well-positioned to move into the next stage of growth and success for Salesforce, our customers, partners and communities.”

We’re always pumped to be a part of the Salesforce community, and seeing an important role model like Jayne-Anne lead the UK and Ireland business has made us even prouder to shout about Salesforce. I wonder if she’ll be up for speaking at our next Salesforce Women in Tech event?

Events happening this month: The Nottingham Salesforce User Group

After cancelling last month’s event due to the grizzly weather, it’s finally time for our Spring Salesforce User Group event! We’ve got an amazing agenda for both Salesforce users and those thinking about implementing Salesforce, covering some brilliant topics and hands-on demonstrations. Join us on Thursday 19th April from 2pm, where we’ll be talking about…

Read moreEvents happening this month: The Nottingham Salesforce User Group