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Notes from The Nottingham Digital Summit

Thanks to Hallam, this year’s Nottingham Digital Summit was even bigger and better than last year. Across not one, but three stages there were talks on thought leadership, customer experience, future trends, business management, creative campaigns, SEO and more.

So, after a full-on weekend walking around Glastonbury with inadequate footwear, I hobbled down to the Nottingham Playhouse to a) introduce myself back into civilisation and b) learn some useful stuff. And to no surprise, it was yet another awesome day full of practical advice and inspiration. Here are some of my notebook scribbles, translated.

Storytelling and future gazing — Billy Williams 

Very few businesses have zero digital presence these days, so it’s more important than ever to craft our digital services carefully and deliberately.  

Let’s go back to 2009 when the iPhone had only been around for two years, and Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Amazon had just started becoming Tech giants. They have a phrase in Silicon Valley: “Move fast and break things”. We’re increasingly learning from data and moving at such a fast rate. But with all this data, users become faceless, quantitative data points, and that affects our customer experiences.  

“The thing I have noticed is when the anecdotes and the data disagree, the anecdotes are usually right.”  

– Jeff Bezos 

Digital experiences are rapidly expanding and becoming more diverse. Billy’s example of this was Ikea’s virtual reality app — every part of that customer journey is digital. however, Billy still wanted that personal touch; he wanted to physically go into the Ikea store.  So, what do we do?

Borrow from the past and turn to storytelling 

“Advertising is about one thing, happiness”  

– Don Draper, Mad Men 

Everything in the advertising world of the 1950s and 1960s was about storytelling. We need to take from that and be more ‘user-centered’ and ‘emotionally-led’. We need to be thoughtful about emotive design instead of relying on just data-driven design.  

So how do we tell stories with our customer journey? 

Billy used the 90s TV show ‘Friends’ as his example of great storytelling, which might not be very high-brow, but each episode has a simple story arc that everything leads back to — will Ross and Rachel get together? 

The little touches matter, and each platform within your customer experience should have its own role and lead back to the underlying theme.  

Take Monzo, for example. They claim to be ‘The bank of the future’. Their whole experience is community-led, they make you the star of the show, and they provide engaging imagery like colourful graphical interfaces and emoji notifications. This isn’t anything like any other bank we know!

Why does this work? Because they know it’s the little things that make their customers smile — like sending a mobile notification with a Swedish flag and a hot dog emoji whenever they shop at Ikea. Billy’s conclusion is that digital storytelling can be an optimistic and more human approach to product development, and that we should all be doing it.  

SEO and UX teams, unite! – Ben Wood and Julio Taylor 

The second talk of the day was led by a Digital Director and Creative Director. These guys were discussing the dynamics of SEO and Design, showing us how UX teams and SEO teams don’t collaborate enough, and telling us why it’s important that we change this.  

With the introduction of Google’s Rankbrain, Google is now understanding search queries and measuring how people interact with search results. Specifically, it’s looking at: 

  • Organic click-through rate 
  • Dwell time 
  • Bounce rate 
  • Pogo-sticking 

https://backlinko.com/google-rankbrain-seo

So, SEO needs to consider UX design. And UX design also must adapt to this ever-changing human behaviour.  

Take Voice Search for example. These trends are conditioning users to discover and expect information faster. Design and SEO need to work together to create a great user experience that caters to this.  

Key takeaways? Work from the same brief, make your work visible, control your ego, and believe in the mission. 

The power of archetypal branding – Matt Davies 

Brand is the meaning people attach to you. But the problem here is that it seems out of your control. You need to manage your own branding; you need to create your meaning and own it. So what’s the best way to create meaning? Well, Matt Davies says it’s all in the stories we tell. 

Think back to when you were a child. How did you learn about and understand the world around you? Through stories, that’s how.  

Branding includes your culture, your product/services, your customer experience, and your marketing communications, so we need to have a strong story that feeds into each of these branding elements. Matt Davis says there are 3 key strategies here: 

  1. Know your customer story 
    Make the customer the hero of your story. 
  2. Know your archetypal character 
    Archetypes are a recognizable stereotype of a character in a story. For example, Harry Potter is the hero of his story, right?

    These archetypes help us to manage our meaning by telling better stories. According to Carl Jung, there are twelve archetypes, and Matt says we need to pick one of them for our branding.

    This is so we can be consistent throughout everything we do; picking too many archetypes, he says, can confuse people about who you are as a brand.
     

Image result for the 12 archetypes
https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/

3. Live your story 
Finally, allow your story to flow through every part of your business. 

Why is this worth it? Well, just think of a Gucci handbag — functionally, its exactly the same as any other handbag. However, people are willing to pay much more for a handbag with their logo on as they identify with that meaning.

Recommended reading: The Hero and the Outlaw – Building extraordinary brands through the power of archetypes by Margaret Mark and Carol S. Pearson 

Impero’s Cloud Journey – Nikki Annison 

Next up was Nikki Annison from Impero Software demonstrating how they created a fully-integrated campaign for their journey to the Cloud. They went with the four C’s of campaign success: coherence, consistency, continuity, and complementary. They also used Kotter’s 8 steps to change to really make an impact: 

https://www.kotterinc.com/8-steps-process-for-leading-change/

Impero came up with their desired action, communication objectives, and started getting their team, existing customers, and new businesses involved at an early stage. Everyone on the team was especially involved during the creative process.  

Before selling the benefits with conviction and evidence, they needed to create awareness. So to get people talking, they wanted to pick a fun theme as an analogy. As they were doing a big product launch, they decided to go with a movie premiere theme, and this underpinned the whole marketing campaign.  

And of course, they couldn’t have a movie launch without a trailer. Seriously, watch this — it’s utterly brilliant: 



Key takeaways: 

  • Consistency is key 
  • Involve everyone 
  • Track success and share 
  • Have fun! 

Lessons from working at Google – Robert Craven 

Robert kickstarted his talk with tremendous energy; energy that wasn’t initially reciprocated on such a hot, long day. But he tried again, asking the audience to cheer as if their favourite band had just come on stage at Glastonbury, and it worked.

This is probably the kind of energy that landed him a job at Google, and here’s what he says he learned while working there:

  • Mindset 
    Here, Robert talks about having a ‘can-do’ attitude and asking us what’s holding us back. We were then asked to think of one thing that holds us back every day and talk to the person next to us about it. Then, he noted that most of us would have started our sentence with ‘They, he, or she’ — putting the blame on someone else is something we as humans are really bloody good at doing. It’s never our fault, always ‘theirs’.  
     
    Secondly, he noted how Google uses this concept called ‘Moonshot Thinking’, which is basically thinking outside of the box, being bold and brave, and not being afraid to try new things and maybe mess up.  
     
  • Speed 
    Google moves twice as fast as everyone else. In fact, they don’t even bother with business plans for the year; all their plans are actually 12-week business plans. Robert says he never knew what he’d be doing next quarter. At Google, everything moves faster, everything happens quicker, they learn more in a shorter amount of time, and it makes things more exciting.  
     
  • Team 
    Psychological safety — it’s okay to take risks, it’s okay to be vulnerable in front of each other. 
     
    Dependability, structure and clarity — everyone knows what they’re responsible for and what they’re always supposed to be doing. 
     
    Meaning — each team member knows what they’re doing is worthwhile and that they’re each making an impact. 
     
  • OKRs 
    Google use Objectives and Key Results, which is a goal system that creates alignment and engagement around measurable goals. They’re usually frequently set, tracked and re-evaluated quarterly. The goal is to make sure everyone is constantly and consistently going in the same direction with clear priorities.  

Not only was this a huge day filled with some seriously impressive talks, but we also managed to raise an insane £18,047.21 for Samaritans with our tickets (plus more donations were made via Larry the unicorn on the day!).

Larry the unicorn Samaritans

I can’t wait for next year! What did you learn? Let us know in the comments below!

Is Salesforce right for your nonprofit?

Rallying donors, engaging with your community and hitting your fundraising targets isn’t easy when you’ve got hardly any time, resources or IT budget. And even if you were to install new technologies to help you overcome your everyday challenges, the chances are they won’t be tailored enough to suit your specific organisation’s needs. The struggle is most certainly real for nonprofits doing demanding, important work with limited resources. Could Salesforce be the answer?

Read moreIs Salesforce right for your nonprofit?

Ethical tech, responsible marketing and mental health

We’re pretty lucky, these days. Thanks to technology like Salesforce, we can analyse data, make predictions, and recommend actions based on in-depth data insights and machine learning. This means marketers can plan, produce, personalise, promote and overall perform better on a much bigger scale.

AI, hyper-personalisation and micro-targeting are already in full swing, affecting how we as brands interact with our audiences, and their potential to manipulate negative human emotions isn’t really understood yet, but it’s still a real concern.

One thing is for sure; AI is known to have the potential to produce outcomes that infringe on our human rights, damage our businesses, and hurt our society. So with these new powers comes a responsibility to do good things with them — we’ve all been given the chance to decide the path our industry will take as we move into the future of technology.

The truth is that technology can help or harm society, and it’s companies just like us, and just like Salesforce, who have the responsibility to make sure we put empathy, trust, and inclusivity first. In every ad, every email, and every marketing campaign, we need to consider our inherent human nature to be compassionate and vulnerable.

The race to capture human attention isn’t going away, but we can do this without capitalising on vulnerabilities.

Responsible Marketing

“There are two reasons people buy things… Those reasons are guilt and anxiety”

This depressing quote comes from Emotions Matter, a guide to Return on Ethics (ROE) by Phrasee. Here, CEO Parry Malm is quoting one of his first bosses, who believed that if a marketing campaign could summon these negative emotions in its audience, sales would follow. And although this strategy definitely feels like a dodgy way to do business, the sad truth, he says, is that it sometimes worked.

But we don’t have to use people’s negative human emotions to sell; the statistics are there. More and more, people are making their purchasing decisions with their morals and beliefs. Besides, you shouldn’t have to trick people into buying something. Not only is it exploiting instead of empowering, but it’s just lazy marketing.

The statistics

Nelson found that 66% of consumers are willing to pay more for socially conscious brands, and this number moves to around 90% when you look at only millennials and Gen Z.

– ‘Emotions Matter: a guide to Return on Ethics (ROE)’ by Phrasee — quote from Amy Williams, Social Entrepreneur and Good-Loop founder

Consumers see human rights as a business imperative. 90% of consumers believe companies have a responsibility to improve the state of the world. 

– Salesforce Research, October 2018 

87% of consumers believe companies have a responsibility to advocate for human rights.

– Salesforce Research, October 2018 

72% of teens think they’re being manipulated by technology. They believe that tech companies manipulate users to spend more time on their devices.

– ‘How to Stop Technology From Destabilizing the World’ — Tristan Harris, Co-Founder of the Center for Humane Technology

93% of consumers are concerned about emerging technology’s potential to bring misinformation

– Salesforce Research, October 2018 

77% of consumers are concerned about emerging technology’s potential to bring increased/widened inequality.

– Salesforce Research, October 2018 

81% of consumers believe emerging tech can make a better place.

– Salesforce Research, October 2018

67% of consumers say that technology is neither good nor bad – how it’s used is what matters.

– Salesforce Research, October 2018

Smart tech with unplanned consequences

YouTube has an auto-play feature which will automatically schedule a related video for you after you’ve finished watching something. You can turn the auto-play feature off so you don’t end up falling down an endless ‘YouTube hole’ like I so often do, but it’ll still show you recommended videos based on what you’ve already shown an interest in. This is entirely chosen by the algorithm, which is amazing!

What wasn’t expected was the consequences this can result in. For example, one minute you could be a new mum or dad watching videos giving tips and sharing new parent experiences, and the next, the algorithm thinks: ‘here’s a video that will probably interest this person based around what they’ve watched before’. Before you know it, you’re being shown an anti-vaxxer video — which will then prompt the algorithm to show you other conspiracy videos.

Facebook has a similar problem with its algorithm for Suggested Groups; tenuously leading some people to far-right groups and hate speech. But it’s also making us experience something called ‘Learned Helplessness‘, where people are learning about big global human problems that they can’t do anything about on a much bigger scale. Really, it’s no wonder there’s a strong link between social media and mental health issues.

Technology at its worst, as certain experts like to remind us, can adversely affect our mental health. It can lead to feelings of isolation and depression, as well as negatively impacting our social skills, concentration levels, attention spans and sleep patterns; there’s an emotional risk.

– ‘Emotions Matter: Technology’s role in Mental Health’, in conversation with DR Fjola Helgadottir, PHD R.Psych

We as social media users need to change the way we’re raising awareness of world-issues from the negative ‘this is terrible, look at all the plastics polluting our oceans’ to the more positive message of ‘look, here’s the great thing being done about plastics in our oceans.’ This is obviously something we can’t enforce, but we can talk about and encourage. And I know I’m going to be more mindful about how my messaging affects people when sharing these issues in the future.

Snapchat also has photo filters which distort reality to create fun, silly selfies to share with your friends. The thing is, they also include heavily-used ‘beautification filters’ which edit and manipulate your natural facial features by giving you smoother skin, bigger lips, a smaller nose, higher cheekbones, a smaller jaw etc.  

Gigi Hadid using a Snapchat filer sourced from Inverse’s article ‘Plastic Surgeons Are Really Worried About “Snapchat Dysmorphia”‘

Worryingly, both young adults and teenagers, who are pretty much at the peak of discovering their self-identity, are using these filters, meaning Snapchat is — whether knowingly or not — profiting on one of our key vulnerabilities; body confidence and self-image.  

As Commissioner Sharon Bowen of Seneca Women states in ‘Ethical Responsibility in the Fourth Industrial Revolution’, “just because you can go 120 miles per hour, doesn’t mean you should do so in a school zone.” 

Smart tech with a positive impact

However, there are loads of examples of how tech can be used to impact our mental health in a positive way. Dr Helgadottir, AI-Therapy Founder, has established Overcome Social Anxiety (OSA), which is a fully-automated treatment programme for social anxiety. And this, she says, has already treated people from over 30 countries.

FaceTime is another example of this. There’s nothing wrong with FaceTime; it’s positively impacted everyone. Especially those who work long hours away from home who want to feel close to their loved ones.

What can we do?

We need to start by looking at an honest appraisal of human nature. The next phase of our evolution is doing the uncomfortable thing and looking back at ourselves. And seeing that yes, we’re vulnerable to social validation. Yes, we’re vulnerable to magician’s tricks. And yes, we’re vulnerable to supercomputers. And yes, we’re vulnerable to algorithms that split-test 66,000 variations of toxicity or hate speech.

‘How to Stop Technology From Destabilizing the World’ — Tristan Harris, Co-Founder of the Center for Humane Technology

Honesty and transparency are key here. And we need to be thoughtful about our human vulnerabilities, but leverage our strengths and focus on the positives.  

In her article for Phrasee’s Ethical Marketing guide, ‘Market Differently: How does your marketing measure up for mental health?’, Bernadette Fallon goes through some guidelines for being sensitive and thoughtful in our marketing activities. We think they’re pretty spot on:

  1. Don’t make false claims 
  2. Don’t exaggerate facts or distort the truth
  3. Don’t promote messages that exploit your customer’s negative emotions (guilt, anxiety, anger etc.)
  4. Don’t use fear tactics
  5. Don’t conceal important information
  6. Don’t bad-mouth your rivals
  7. Don’t copy competitors
  8. Don’t be racist, sexist, ageist or fall foul of any other ‘ist
  9. Don’t exploit children
  10. Don’t spam your customers.

What Salesforce is doing

We know that technology is not inherently good or bad; it’s what we do with it that matters. And that’s why we’re making the ethical and humane use of technology a strategic focus at Salesforce.

– Mark Benioff, Chairman and CEO of Salesforce. 

Salesforce count trust, equality, and diversity among their core values, which are values we also share. They want to actively educate people to help them be a part of this conversation and think about ethical implications. Check out their ‘Ethics and Humane Use’ page right here.

Empower, don’t exploit

So the message is to empower, not exploit. Tech is moving at such a fast pace now, and its potential to positively or negatively impact society is only growing. But we mustn’t forget that we still have the power to use these new tools to create a respectful, positive experience for everyone. There’s a clear call for every business to introduce an Ethics Policy, and we’re working on ours right now.

Salesforce customer portals vs. Communities

Thinking of turning your old customer portal into to a Community? These days, Communities are the only available option from Salesforce. If you already own an old-school portal from way-back-when, Salesforce will kindly allow you to keep it alive. But before you get too excited by that, you might want to see what a new Community can do instead.

Read moreSalesforce customer portals vs. Communities

10 great tools for monitoring customer satisfaction

Being in the age of the empowered customer, we’re all increasingly expecting more convenient ways to solve our customer service issues. It’s a no-brainer — by making sure customer service is accessible to suit these expectations, businesses are more likely to build brand-loyalty and receive repeat purchases. That’s why there have been so many new and improved customer service tools popping up all over the place.
Here are 10 of the best tools for providing and measuring great customer experience.

Read more10 great tools for monitoring customer satisfaction

The top 6 benefits of Salesforce Communities

Salesforce Community Cloud is an online platform where companies can connect customers, partners, and employees with each other, and the data or records they need to get their work done. As such, they’re a great, secure way to gain deeper insight, collaborate, and form better relationships with the people who are most important to your business’ growth. We love ’em, and here’s why you should too.

Read moreThe top 6 benefits of Salesforce Communities

My first month at oe:gen

It’s been one month since I started working at oe:gen, and this is what I have to say…

To date I’ve been very fortunate in my career progression, working within some great companies, engaging with great people and overcoming many challenges across multiple industries.

Leaving a company has always been a very positive experience for me. Each time I’ve decided to move on, it’s been on the basis that I’ve simply outgrown my position or require a more challenging environment to fully use my skillset and push myself forward. In either case, it’s always been on good terms with my employer and the old company’s doors have always been left hanging wide open should I ever want to return.

Starting a new job, however, is a totally different story. I’m no longer surrounded by people I‘ve known for years, no longer talking confidently about subjects I know inside and out. What systems are they using? What are their processes? Who are these people? What am I doing?!

Although it doesn’t normally take long for these fears to dissolve, the first few weeks in a new company can be tough, and on some occasions, I’ve found myself asking if it was too late to turn back!

oe:gen, on the other hand, was different. One month in and already I feel fully integrated, valued and my input respected. There have been no nerves, just a little self-doubt (I’m only human, after all), and only three outfits changes required on day one!

These are my top 5 reasons why…

They invest in developing their people

I’ve been at oe:gen for one month and I’ve already:

  • Attended a Salesforce Women in Tech event
  • Attended a Salesforce Administration User group
  • Attended two agile events
  • Received internal training on ‘guest speaking’
  • And have a program of events already mapped out for the months ahead.

This is more training in one month than a whole annual program in previous companies. Encouraging and providing these soft skills really shows oe:gen is committed to developing their team and investing
to support the growth of the company. This also doesn’t cover the personal development plans that are carried out and reviewed every three months to make sure each person is achieving their own personal goals! 

The office

This might seem like an odd one, but I’ve always been envious when I see other companies’ Instagram posts of bean bag meeting rooms with their brightly coloured decor and popcorn makers. Well, not any more with the bright blue and yellow decor, whiteboard and blackboard walls, a foosball table, and on my second day being invited to a retro gaming lunchtime session… SAY WHAT?! I’m now ‘that person who works at that place’!

Not only is the office a bright, fun and inviting place to be, it’s also laid out in a way that encourages a free flow open environment. This means you can catch a quick relaxing meeting in the comfortable seating area or have a break while making a cup of tea looking over the living wall. You can even have two minutes thinking time while reviewing the inspirational wall of images submitted by each member of the team.

In one company, I wasn’t even allowed to have my kid’s first school photo on my desk due to it being a ‘distraction’, and yet now here I am with full access to the Spotify playlist. Get ready because here comes some old-school 1980’s hip hop!

The culture

Office culture… that’s a thing, right? Well, up until now I didn’t quite realise how important this was. From the team members to the biodegradable stationery, the oe:gen culture is the life force running through the veins of the company.

This not only sets the tone of the documents it produces, but also defines how the business is run, the message it sends out, who is working within the team, and who their customers are – going along the lines of “if you’re not a right fit, you’re not allowed in!”

Although the oe:gen team is equipped with an amazing set of skills, they also have to be a representative of the oe:gen culture. I’ve worked in companies where, although the IT department has adopted agile (or tried to) and is committed to improved change with open and honest communication, the rest of the company failed to also adopt the same culture. This means you’re constantly pushing water uphill, and no one wants to do that.

Culture also applies to the customer base; in order to have a healthy, long-lasting, productive relationship, our customers also must be the right fit. You can’t put a square peg in a round hole and expect everything to run smoothly. That’s not to say its oe:gen’s way or the highway – it’s about establishing a good fit and building a relationship and the shared agreement of how the projects are going to work, which turns the ‘ To whom it may concern’ emails to ‘Hey John, how was the camping trip?’

The people

The oe:gen team are more like a close-knit friendship group than work colleagues. They truly care about each other and have a supportive and inclusive ethos. For example, the development team have a concept of ‘swarming’, which isn’t something I’ve experienced in other workplaces.

‘Swarming’, for those of you (like me!) who don’t know, is when a particular development item is blocked or the developer has hit a creative road block. When this occurs, all the other Developers will
put down tools (where possible), collectively ‘swarm’ together, review the item and help solve the problem or give some additional insight to support each other and remove the blockage… it’s brilliant!

The senior managers also sit amongst the team and encourage open and honest conversations. They have an open-door policy (possibly because there aren’t any!) and are all just as prepared to roll up their sleeves and dig in to help push projects to the deadline if needed.

Being truly valued

Having multicoloured hair, riding a motorbike and having visible tattoos can sometimes make me a target for pre-judgment, regardless of my technical ability or amazing personality! *wink*

In the past, I would always wash out any colour and cover up my tattoos, and this could sometimes span the whole of a probation period just to ensure that I don’t offend or scare someone within the company.

However, oe:gen accepted me for who I am and truly value the skillset and insights that I bring to the company, I was encouraged to speak up in meetings and my points and perspective were always considered. I was introduced to clients without hesitation and not judged on the clothes I wore or the colour of my hair, but encouraged to be myself, which make me feel truly valued.

I was really taken aback in my second week when Col, the project designer asked me to submit some of my own inspirational images to be included to the new kitchen table … instantly, I was made to feel a part of the building and part of the team and that my views and passions were important. It was a simple gesture that really made my day!

So, in summary…

When people ask me how I’m getting on, I can’t help but have a wide smile on my face and relay the above points.

I’m now working in a fun and exciting environment, a company culture that’s passionate about inspiring its highly skilled, inclusive people, with senior management fully investing in developing the whole team to ensure they’re providing the best possible outcomes for clients.

So, yeah! It’s not going too bad!

The ultimate Lightning Experience toolkit

Lightning Experience Tools

With each and every release, Lightning Experience gets more and more impressive. Businesses who are still using Classic are beginning to get some serious FOMO, but most have no idea where to even begin. Luckily, there are loads of Salesforce tools to help you.

To help you start thinking seriously about your Lightning Transition, here are all of our go-to tools for Lightning Transition in one handy article.

1. Free guide for transitioning from Classic to Lightning (without the headache)

First of all, we’ve provided some best practices to get you on your way in the form of an in-depth step-by-step process, so you can learn how to transition from Classic to Lightning with ease.

Download it for absolutely nothing right here.

2. Lightning Experience Readiness Check and Lightning Experience Visualforce Check

How do know if you can handle transitioning to Lightning? Well, the Readiness Check tool scans your features and customisations, then it emails you a report on your Lightning Experience readiness.

The report gives you a better sense of how your tabs, objects, related lists, buttons, AppExchange packages–and more–work in Lightning Experience.

The Visualforce Report highlights key things in your Visualforce pages that either aren’t supported in Lightning Experience or can break things your users.

This helps you see which features and customisations are ready to be struck by Lightning, and those that need a little more attention before you transition.

3. Lightning Experience Configuration Converter

You’ve probably been happily using JavaScript buttons in the Classic UI for years, but now you’re moving to Lightning Experience and these buttons are kind of holding you back.

This tool scans for your Javascript buttons and creates point-and-click Lightning alternatives for them with just a few mouseclicks, so they don’t have to hold you back any more.

4. Magic Mover for Notes and Attachments

This tool does bulk conversions of Classic notes to Enhanced Notes and attachments to Salesforce Files.

This is necessary because files are optimised for Lightning Experience and have more capabilities beyond what Attachments can do — things like the ability to relate files to multiple records, track multiple versions, and view file previews.

Enhanced Notes are similarly optimised for Lightning Experience and can do way more than Classic Notes, such as the ability to relate a note to multiple records and track multiple versions.

5. Lightning Experience Usage App

This allows you to track user adoption metrics and visualise usage trends with daily updates, meaning you can monitor progress and make informed decisions about the user experience of Lightning.

It gives you insights like daily active users, the number of users who switch to Salesforce Classic per day, and the most-visited Lightning Experience pages, so you can understand what your users might need and focus on what’s really stopping them from adopting the new UI.

6. Salesforce Optimiser

This one gives you personalised, actionable recommendations for tweaking your implementation so it works to the best of its ability. Using this helps you clean up customisations, reduce any complex bits, and ultimately drive user and feature adoption.

If you’re still feeling a bit out of your depth, it’s totally understandable. Transitioning to Lightning is not an easy thing to do, especially if you’ve got lots of Classic-loving users. That’s why we now provide Salesforce Lightning Transition as one of our expert services. Check out our latest success story for Bee Midtown’s Lightning Transition right here to see how we helped them make the change for good.